Piante d’appartamento sicure per cani e gatti

Although it is helpful to know which houseplants are safe for cats and dogs, it is very important to be aware of the houseplants that are harmful to them .
Sinningia speciosa plants are popular gift plants, especially around holidays like Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day. If you receive one of these gorgeous bloomers, you won’t need to worry about it harming your cat or dog. Provide indirect light and constant moisture for this Brazilian native.
African violets (Saintpaulia) are one of the most popular flowering houseplants due to their ability to bloom in low light and their affinity for the same environmental conditions that people like: moderate temperatures and average humidity. Choose a soil-free potting mix and use a balanced fertilizer for best African violet health.
This creeping mat of tiny green leaves of Soleirolia soleirolii adds character to terrariums, small hanging baskets, and as a companion plant around the base of indoor trees. Baby tears plants cover the soil and might discourage pets that like to dig in your houseplants.
Large houseplants like the weeping fig make a bold statement in the home but are toxic to cats and dogs. However, the banana tree (Musa) is a dramatic accent plant that is safe for all pets. Rich soil, bright light, and regular watering will emulate the natural habitat of the banana tree.
Thank you, spider plant (Chlorophytum), for looking just as cool today as you did in grandma’s kitchen in 1978. Also known as ribbon plant or airplane plant, the spider plant is non-toxic to cats and dogs and will tolerate a wide range of light, moisture, and soil conditions.
Carnivorous plants make a fun and funky addition to a houseplant collection, but what happens when kitty wants to pounce on one of those traps when they snap shut? Venus flytraps (Dionaea muscipula) are non-toxic to cats and dogs, so a curious nibble won’t result in a trip to see a veterinarian. Bright light and irrigation with distilled water will keep your traps in fly-catching condition.
Also known as the butterfly palm, Dypsis lutescens makes any interior feel like a piece of the tropics. Sometimes palm fronds can trigger a cat’s playful swatting and biting instincts, so it’s comforting to know that the areca palm isn’t toxic for cats or dogs. Place it in a bright room, and allow soil to dry out between waterings.
Boston ferns (Nephrolepis) are an enduring houseplant favorite, but their shaggy fronds might tempt cats and dogs to chew on them. The foliage is non-toxic to cats and dogs, so brighten up your guest room or bathroom with these lush plants. Boston ferns prefer humidity and lots of bright, indirect light.
Calathea spp. plants also called zebra plants or peacock plants, bear large tropical leaves with fascinating stripes or stippling. A calathea is an excellent choice for a shady spot in the house, as too much light can cause the foliage color to fade.
Pilea involucrata is a trailing plant with fragile stems that thrives in high humidity. It does well as a terrarium specimen, making it even more unlikely that your cat or dog will take an unauthorized nibble.
The green, pink, red, and white splashed foliage of Hypoestes phyllostachya is so ornamental that you won’t need to worry about providing the perfect conditions to trigger blooming that many houseplants need. Although non-toxic to cats and dogs, sensitive pets might experience mild digestive upset if they consume large quantities of the polka dot plant or other non-toxic plants.

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